Diploma mills reopen

EDITORIAL

This may sound disheartening but, our education industry has long become, as it had always been, a virtual diploma mill because unlike in other countries, our situation is that we are producing more diplomas than jobs.

Schools and classes will go full blast this week and in August and this is the sad situation year in and year out.

What then is the use of the biggest budget of government for education when after college, our graduates either go jobless or leave for abroad because in our country there is hardly any vacancy, unless one goes to private business, and to add, unless one has connections. Working on one’s merits is not the name of the game here. Most graduates do not qualify for present jobs available.  This is the biggest mis-match of the century.

Worst of all, our “bonus pater familia” culture will not mind sheltering our graduates at home until kingdom come, be they  get married  or stay single.

Proof: of six thousand jobs offered in many job fairs, only a few hundreds are hired. Always, and Why? Because our graduates do not qualify. Why? Because the system of education in this country cannot produce graduates that could qualify and start a job-career. Most of all, there is not enough training in school that could match the need of industries after graduation..

But in fairness to our colleges and universities, they do their best in offering quality and  relevant courses. But the big question is : why are only a handfull   hired during job fairs which are offering thousands of new jobs. Why? Are the kind of courses offered wrong? Or do graduates simply lack enough training and preparation for the jobs?

In the fact, because of this very sad predicament of unqualified graduates for jobs, we see the very urgent need for our education department to sit down with industries and see HOW college graduates will qualify and be trained so they can get jobs after college.

In Singapore, we interviewed students who say that government evaluates their skills and grades, and tell them what course they may or should take so they can work after graduation. The students are looking forward to an assigned job after college. They feel secure. But not in the Philippines, our graduates are very insecure.

So we know the problem. Society , both government and industries must agree on how they can  prepare jobs and seriously train our graduating seniors so as not to produce jobless graduates year after year.

When will we ever see the day when diplomas and jobs will match each other?